“First Lady But Second Fiddle” or the rise and rejection of the political couple in the White House: 1933-today - Archive ouverte HAL Accéder directement au contenu
Article Dans Une Revue European journal of American studies Année : 2015

“First Lady But Second Fiddle” or the rise and rejection of the political couple in the White House: 1933-today

(1)
1

Résumé

The First Lady has emerged as an institution of great influence. Whether out in the open like Hillary Clinton or behind the scenes like Nancy Reagan, most First Ladies have served as their husbands’ most trusted and closest political allies. Thus the modern era has seen the advent of the presidential couple, as symbolically epitomized in the 1990s' neologism “Billary.” It seems, however, that the American public is not ready to accept power-sharing in the White House and that the First Lady, visible and influential though she might be, should not play the role of a co-president. A number of feminists simply propose to “abolish” her.

Dates et versions

hal-02867694 , version 1 (15-06-2020)

Identifiants

Citer

Pierre-Marie Loizeau. “First Lady But Second Fiddle” or the rise and rejection of the political couple in the White House: 1933-today. European journal of American studies, 2015, 10 (1), Non spécifié. ⟨10.4000/ejas.10525⟩. ⟨hal-02867694⟩
36 Consultations
0 Téléchargements

Altmetric

Partager

Gmail Facebook Twitter LinkedIn More